Recent Updates

  • Updated on: Apr 22, 2013

    Constructing the robot program

    Sample program for driving a simple robot with a Mecanum drive, wrist and elevator both with potentiometer feedback, and a gripper that operates open-loop by time. This is the sample that was developed for the 2013 World Championship Conference session.

    Manual RobotBuilder
  • Updated on: Apr 02, 2013

    Light codes on control system components

    Many of the components of the FRC Control System have indicator lights that can be used to quickly diagnose problems with your robot. This guide shows each of the hardware components and describes the meaning of the indicators. Photos and information from Innovation FIRST and Cross the Road Electronics.

  • This document describes how to rewrite a simple autonomous into a command based autonomous. Hopefully, going through this process will help those more familiar with the older simple autonomous method understand the command based method better. By re-writing it as a command based program, there are several benefits in terms of testing and reuse. For this example, all of the logic is abstracted out into functions primarily so that the focus of this example can be on the structure.

  • If you have any Control System issue at your event that you need assistance with, each event has at least one Control System Advisor who is there to help. This year FRC will be using the NI Parkway system to help teams connect with the CSA and indicate they have an issue. The Parkway System can be accessed using the Parkway Kiosk found at your event (ask Pit Admin if you can't locate it) or via a mobile device.

  • Once commands are defined they can run in either the teleop or autonomous part of the program. In fact, the power of the command based programming approach is that you can reuse the same commands in either place. If the robot has a command that can shoot Frisbees during autonomous with camera aiming and accurate shooting, there is no reason not to use it to help the drivers during the teleop period of the game.

  • Updated on: Feb 13, 2013

    Creating groups of commands

    Once you have created commands to operate the mechanisms in your robot, they can be grouped together to get more complex operations. These groupings of commands are called CommandGroups and are easily defined as shown in this article.

  • The Netbeans FRC plugins will use FTP to download a program to the robot. It relies on a program called the "OTA Server" on the robot to force the robot to reboot after the download is complete. The first time you download a program after reimaging the cRIO the OTA server is downloaded along with your program. Since it was not running you have to manually reboot the robot the first time after the reimaging. After that, it will reboot automatically since the OTA server will start up when the robot boots.

  • If you are using the command-based programming features of WPILib, you will find that they are very well integrated with SmartDashboard. It can help diagnose what the robot is doing at any time and it gives you control and a view of what's currently running.

  • Updated on: Feb 01, 2013

    Axis M1013 Camera Compatibility

    It has come to our attention that the Axis M1011 camera has been discontinued and superseded by the Axis M1013 camera. This document details any differences or issues we are aware of between the two cameras when used with WPILib and the provided sample vision programs.

  • Updated on: Jan 29, 2013

    Measuring Bandwidth Usage

    On the 2013 FRC Field (and at home when the DAP-1522 is configured using the FRC Bridge Configuration Utility) each team is limited to 7Mb/s of network traffic (see the FMS Whitepaper for more details). The FMS Whitepaper provides information on determining the bandwidth usage of the Axis camera, but some teams may wish to measure their overall bandwidth consumption. This document details how to make that measurement.